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Igniting the American Revolution

'Igniting the American Revolution: 1773-1775' book cover

Igniting the American Revolution:
1773–1775

Derek W. Beck’s new nonfiction book follows the forgotten Dr. Joseph Warren through the beginning of the Revolution, from the Boston Tea Party and Paul Revere’s Ride to the daylong battle that began west of Boston, in Lexington and Concord, which in turn ignited a Revolution.

Released Oct 6, 2015. (Naperville, IL: Sourcebooks)

480p. Biblio. Notes. Index. 

Awards

Honorable Mention for Best New U.S. Revolutionary History Book by the Fraunces Tavern Museum, bestowed April 25, 2016. 

Praise

“For those who like their history rich in vivid details, Derek Beck has served up a delicious brew in this book… This may soon become everyone’s favorite.” ―Thomas Fleming, author of Liberty! The American Revolution

“It is in the clear, engaging telling of a complex story that Igniting the American Revolution by Derek W. Beck stands out… It is precise while being straightforward to read, shows the passion of the participants without taking sides, and gives equal play to the political and military affairs.” —Don N. Hagist, author of British Soldiers, American War and editor of Journal of the American Revolution (full review)

“Recommended for history lovers, those who want a refresher on the American Revolution, and those who enjoy quality nonfiction.” ―Library Journal (STARRED REVIEW) (full review)

“He [Beck] takes special care to offer up insights and perspectives not only from both sides of the Atlantic, but also from both sides of the conflict, since there were many colonials who would remain loyal to Britain.” ―Historical Novel Society (which rarely reviews nonfiction history) (full review)

“Derek Beck delivers a remarkable account of the beginning of the American Revolution. The sheer depth and breadth of his research make this a must-have volume for any history buff. A magnificent resource.” —Todd Andrlik, author of Reporting the Revolutionary War and editor of Journal of the American Revolution

“Beck’s description of the ‘spreading flames of rebellion’ and the taking of the forts at Crown Point and Ticonderoga is as engaging as fiction. A knowledgeable, elegant account…” ―Kirkus Reviews (full review)

”…this is definitely a must-have. It shines a light on a less-remembered part of our collective history, and for that alone, Beck should be acclaimed.” ―Conservative Book Club Reviews (EDITOR’S PICK) (full review)

Outline

Contents

Acknowledgements

Preface

PART ONE: RATCHETING TENSIONS (1773–1774)

  1. Dawn of an Epoch 
    • Dec 1773: The Boston Tea Party…
  2. Coercive Measures
    • Jan to Apr 1774: Benjamin Franklin and the Thomas Hutchinson Affair… The History of the Crisis (1763 to 1773)… Parliament Enacts the Coercive Acts…
  3. An Army from Across the Sea 
    • May to Sept 1, 1774: Thomas Gage Arrives in Boston… British Military Buildup… Enforcement of the Coercive Acts… The Cambridge Powder Alarm…
  4. An Unstable Peace 
    • Sept to Dec 1774: First Continental Congress… The Portsmouth Alarm… Unstable Peace of 1774…

PART TWO: TAKING UP ARMS (Jan to Mid-May 1775)

  1. A Disquieting Thaw 
    • Jan to Mar 1775: The Salem Alarm… Boston Massacre Anniversary Oration…
  2. Many Preparations
    • Mar to April 18, 1775: Secret Intelligence Impels Gen. Thomas Gage to Action…
  3. The Die is Cast 
    • April 18 to 19, 1775: Paul Revere’s Ride… The British Expedition to Concord…
  4. The Rending of an Empire 
    • April 19, 1775: First Shots at Lexington… Scouring Concord for War Stores… Skirmish at Concord’s North Bridge…
  5. A Countryside Unleashed 
    • April 19, 1775: The “Battle Road” Back to Boston…
  6. An Emboldened People 
    • April 19 to Early May 1775: Immediate Aftermath… The Siege of Boston…
  7. The Spreading Flames of Rebellion 
    • Early to Mid-May 1775: Making Sense of Lexington and Concord… Rise of Dr. Joseph Warren… Taking of Ft. Ticonderoga…

Epilogue

Appendices

Notes

Bibliography

Index

About the Author

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